Personal Law

Re-scheduling a cancelled wedding? Have you considered a pre or post-nup?

December 2, 2020

For many couples who had planned to get married during 2020 it’s undoubtedly been a time of mixed emotions. With sudden, dramatic cancellations of ceremonies, local lockdowns, and continued uncertainty, many decided to tie the knot in a rush to avoid further disruption and restrictions. Scaled down weddings with a maximum of 15 guests look to be a part of our lives for the foreseeable future, but aside from radically whittling down guest lists, what other legal aspects should you consider?


Wedding Refunds

The Competitions & Markets Authority has written extensively about consumer rights connected to the cancellation of weddings. Their viewpoint is that any nuptials scheduled after the end of September 2020 should have reasonably anticipated that restrictions would still be in place. However, they also agree that should a planned wedding be restricted as a result of another local or national lockdown, meaning that paid for services cannot be reasonably provided, the wedding would therefore be ‘radically different’ to what was originally agreed and the contract could be termed by a court as having come to an end.

With this at the forefront of many wedding providers minds, venues and wedding planners are now offering scaled back wedding packages.

If your wedding has been planned months, or even years, in advance and you are now faced with the prospect of a significantly different ceremony and event, you can reasonably expect a refund minus limited allowable costs and expenses. If you are having difficulties with any suppliers you can contact our litigation team.


Post-Nuptial Agreements


Some couples may have made the decision to rush to reschedule a wedding in order to avoid further potential delays. In the haste to find a space at a venue and rearrange the ceremony, they may have forgotten to draw up a pre-nuptial agreement. A pre-nup is a contract which specifies what will happen to your property or money should you choose to divorce, and is not solely for those who have significant wealth. For couples who individually own property or have savings and assets, drawing up a pre-nup can ensure that should the marriage dissolve, each party’s interests are protected.

If there wasn’t time to draw up a pre-nup, it is still possible to create a post-nuptial agreement. While it isn’t legally binding in England and Wales, the Court will consider the contents in the event of a divorce. This goes some way to ensuring that any assets are still protected.

If you have recently walked down the aisle or are getting married in the next few months, and would like to draw up a pre or post-nup, Jarmans Solicitors offer a free 15 minute, pre-bookable call, or a 45 minute initial consultation for a fixed fee of £99 +VAT. Get in touch on 01795 472291 or email enquiries@jarmans-solicitors.co.uk